RIDBC Matilda Rose Centre Opened by Premier

30/06/11
Jacob, Katrina and Barry O’FarrellJacob and Katrina with NSW Premier, Barry O’Farrell, at the official opening of the RIDBC Matilda Rose Centre

The NSW Premier, Barry O’Farrell, officially opened the Royal Institute for Deaf and Blind Children’s (RIDBC) Eastern Suburbs Early Intervention Centre today.

The RIDBC Matilda Rose Centre provides support for children who have a significant hearing impairment and their families. It also provides services for children with additional special needs.

RIDBC Matilda Rose Centre’s multi-disciplinary early intervention services ensure that children, and their families, receive the early specialised care that is so critical to their child’s development.

“RIDBC Matilda Rose Centre seeks to ensure that these children get the best possible start in life by giving them, and their families, support and assistance from trained professionals across a broad range of fields,” said RIDBC Chief Executive Chris Rehn.

Mr O’Farrell toured the facilities at the War Memorial Hospital with the Member for Coogee, Bruce Notley-Smith and the RIDBC Chief Executive.

“I am proud to open this important facility that will play a key role in the lives of these children and their families, helping support their communication, language and relationships,” Mr O’Farrell said.

He said partnerships with non-government organisations were crucial to the success of services like the Matilda Rose Centre.

Katrina and Brendan Carroll’s five year old son, Jacob, attends RIDBC Matilda Rose Centre due to his significant hearing impairment and cerebral palsy.

“I feel so passionate about the work Matilda Rose staff do. It is holistic care at its best, providing specialist education as well as emotional support. It is an amazing program to experience.”

The Royal Institute for Deaf and Blind Children provides vital support to 1000 children with significant hearing or vision impairment and their families across Australia. As well, RIDBC provides vision and hearing screening to around 2000 babies and children each year.